Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

After weeks of talks and months of political wrangling, German Chancellor Angela Merkel has finally emerged with a deal to form a new governing coalition following inconclusive parliamentary polls in September that left her ruling center-right Christian Democratic Union and its partners in limbo.

The deal Wednesday morning between the CDU and coalition partners, the Christian Social Union (CSU) and the Social Democrats (SPD) ensures that Merkel, who has already served for more than 12 years, will get another term in office.

President Trump has weighed in on the death of Indianapolis Colts linebacker Edwin Jackson, who was killed over the weekend in a suspected drunken-driving accident involving a Guatemalan citizen living in the U.S. illegally.

Steve Wynn, whose casinos have reshaped skylines as far apart as Las Vegas and Macau, has stepped down as head of Wynn Resorts following accusations of sexual misconduct, that became known last month.

In a statement released by the Las Vegas-based company late Tuesday, Wynn pushed back on the accusations against him, which he alleges are part of a campaign led by his ex-wife.

Zimbabwean opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai is critically ill from cancer and may be near death, his family and supporters say.

NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton reports that Tsvangirai, 65, has colon cancer – a fact he revealed in 2016 — and family sources have confirmed that his health is deteriorating. She says he "is said to be suffering from exhaustion, weight-loss, and muscle thinning."

"From the medical report that I received yesterday the situation is not looking good," a source was quoted by Reuters as saying.

Updated at 4:30 a.m. ET

Asian and European markets tumbled Tuesday after dizzying losses on Wall Street that saw the Dow Jones industrial average shed 4.6 percent, its biggest loss in six and a half years.

In Europe, where the trading day was in full swing, the London's FTSE 100, Germany's DAX 30 and France's CAC 40 were all trending down.

In Asia, where the exchanges had all closed:

Thirty-two Russian athletes are appealing to the Swiss-based Court of Arbitration for Sport to lift their doping bans and allow them to compete in Pyeongchang, just days before the opening ceremonies in South Korea.

The appeal comes after the International Olympic Committee's decision in December to disqualify Russia from competing at the Winter Games, citing evidence of systematic, state-sponsored doping at Sochi in 2014.

Lee Jae-yong, the de facto leader of the Samsung conglomerate best known for its electronics, walked free from a South Korean jail on Monday after a court reduced and suspended his five-year sentence on corruption charges handed down less than six months ago.

The appeals court reduced Lee's sentence to a suspended 2 1/2 years, dismissing most of the bribery and corruption charges. It suspended the sentence for four years, meaning Lee, who is also known as Jay Y. Lee, is unlikely to serve any more time.

Lloyds Banking Group said Sunday that it would no longer allow the use of its credit cards to purchase Bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies.

"Across Lloyds Bank, Bank of Scotland, Halifax and MBNA, we do not accept credit card transactions involving the purchase of cryptocurrencies," a company spokeswoman said in an email, according to Reuters.

Lloyds said it would block attempts to buy cryptocurrencies starting on Monday — a move that would make Lloyds, the largest British bank, the first to impose such a ban.

South Africa's ruling African National Congress party is holding meetings to decide the fate of President Jacob Zuma, who is under growing pressure to step down amid corruption allegations.

The party tried and failed to secure an agreement from the 75-year-old Zuma, who has ruled South Africa since 2009, to step down voluntarily. Zuma is apparently not budging and many in the party fear that his fading support could hurt their chances to retain the presidency if he stays on until elections in 2019.

North Korea's ceremonial leader, Kim Yong Nam, will visit South Korea as part of a high-level delegation attending the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics this week amid somewhat eased tensions between the bitter rivals.

Kim is the president of the Presidium of the Supreme People's Assembly and is the nominal head of North Korea, although nearly all real power is concentrated in the hands of third-generation hereditary ruler, Kim Jong Un.

A Wisconsin girl who pleaded guilty to stabbing a classmate as part of a bizarre attempt to gain favor with a fictional Internet character has been ordered committed to a mental institution for 40 years, the maximum penalty sought by prosecutors.

Fidel Castro Díaz-Balart, the eldest son of the late Cuban leader Fidel Castro, has taken his own life, Cuba's state media reports.

The 68-year-old "Fidelito," or "Little Fidel," as he was known, had been hospitalized for depression and was still being treated as an outpatient at the time of his suicide, according to Cuba's official newspaper, Granma.

Four migrants have been shot in a gunfight that broke out between Afghan and Eritrean migrants in France's port city of Calais.

Reports differ on the conditions of the four wounded — The Associated Press says that all four were seriously hurt in the two-hour brawl, but France 24 reports that only one is in critical condition after the fight, involving hundreds of migrants "who had been queueing for food handouts."

A federal judge has declared unconstitutional Florida's procedure for restoring voting rights to felons who have served their time.

In a strongly worded ruling seen as a rebuke of Republican Gov. Rick Scott, who is the lead defendant in the case, U.S. District Judge Mark Walker said the disenfranchisement of felons who have served their time is "nonsensical" and a violation of the First and 14th Amendments to the U.S. Constitution.

Editor's note: This story contains graphic language.

A U.S. expatriate living in Vietnam has run afoul of its communist government and could face criminal charges for a joke posted online about a revered national hero.

Dan Hauer, who teaches English in Hanoi, is married to a local woman and speaks fluent Vietnamese, reportedly has a large following on social media for his popular language videos and observations about Vietnamese and Western culture.

Updated 1:35 p.m. ET

A special tribunal based in Switzerland has overturned lifetime Olympic bans for 28 Russian athletes accused of doping and reinstated their results from the 2014 Winter Games in Sochi.

The Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) based in Lausanne, which has jurisdiction over anti-doping violations, said "the evidence collected was found to be insufficient to establish that an anti-doping rule violation ... was committed by the athletes concerned."

Editor's note: This post contains graphic descriptions that some may find disturbing.

Updated at 3:50 a.m. ET

The Associated Press on Wednesday published a report detailing the existence of several previously undisclosed mass graves of Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar along with shocking details of the systematic execution of victims and attempts to hide evidence of the crime.

The head of Russia's foreign spy service reportedly traveled to the U.S. earlier this month and met with top Trump administration intelligence officials, despite being on a U.S. sanctions blacklist.

In a tweet, Russia's embassy in Washington acknowledged the visit, citing the official ITAR-Tass news agency: "Sergey Naryshkin has visited the United States for consultations with #US counterparts on the struggle against terrorism ..."

The decision by Bill Nye to attend the State of the Union Address alongside the Trump administration's nominee to head NASA has put the celebrity science educator at odds with many scientists.

Nye, who starred in the children's program Bill Nye the Science Guy and now has his own Netflix original series, Bill Nye Saves the World is also CEO of the Planetary Society.

Updated at 6:10 a.m. ET

President Trump on Tuesday signed an executive order to keep open the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, after pledging during the campaign to "load it up with some bad dudes."

NASA's IMAGE spacecraft spent five years studying the Earth's magnetosphere, but when its signal blinked off in 2005, the space agency called it a mission and moved on.

Twelve years later, enter amateur astronomer Scott Tilley.

Updated at 11:45 a.m. ET

Police in Kenya fired teargas on Tuesday, in an effort to break up what authorities called an illegal mass gathering of opposition supporters who staged a swearing-in of their leader as the country's president.

The government subsequently declared the resistance movement "an organized criminal group." The declaration cited Kenya's Prevention of Organized Crimes Act of 2010.

Editor's note: This report contains graphic descriptions that some may find disturbing.

Police in Canada say they are undertaking the grim task of searching backyards, flowerbeds and planters for human remains after a Toronto gardener was charged with killing at least five men and dismembering their bodies.

However, authorities suspect Bruce McArthur — who was arrested on Jan. 18 and initially charged with two counts of first-degree murder — has killed more than just the five people reflected in the charges announced Monday.

The U.S. State Department is calling out Moscow after what it describes as a dangerously close pass by a Russian fighter jet near a U.S. Navy reconnaissance plane over the Black Sea.

"As confirmed by U.S. Naval Forces Europe, a Russian [Su-27] engaged in an unsafe interaction with a U.S. EP-3 in international airspace, with the Russia pilot closing to within 5 feet and crossing directly in front of the EP-3's flight path," State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert said in a statement Monday.

At least seven survivors from a ferry that sank more than a week ago near the Pacific island-nation of Kirabati have been rescued from a small dinghy.

New Zealand's military found the survivors aboard a wooden dinghy after the 56-foot catamaran ferry MV Butiraoi went missing. The vessel was originally thought to be carrying 50 passengers and crew; however, Kirabati President Taneti Mamau later said that up to 100 people may have been aboard.

Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny was briefly detained Sunday after a scuffle with police, who seized him amid protests in various cities calling for a boycott of the March 18 presidential election.

Navalny — a prominent Putin critic and anti-corruption campaigner who leads the country's Progressive Party and has been disqualified from running for president — was wrestled to the ground by police near a demonstration at Moscow's Pushkin Square.

Lewis D'Vorkin, the embattled editor in chief of The Los Angeles Times, is being replaced by veteran Chicago journalist Jim Kirk in a dramatic shakeup at the newspaper that follows weeks of tumult in the newsroom.

The newspaper's parent, Chicago-based Tronc, confirmed the move late Sunday. Kirk, 52, who joined Tronc in August, is a former editor and publisher of The Chicago Sun-Times who briefly served as interim editor at the Times ahead of D'Vorkin's appointment less than five months ago.

Updated at 5:20 a.m. ET

Gunmen attacked an Army Garrison situated near a military academy in the Afghan capital Monday, killing at least five people -– the latest in a series of assaults that have rattled the country in recent weeks.

Jennifer Glasse, reporting for NPR from Kabul, says five heavily armed assailants stormed the police guard outside the Marshal Fahim academy Monday and that Afghan soldiers battled the attackers for several hours.

She says two of the militants detonated suicide vests, two were shot and one was captured.

Grumpy Cat finally has something to smile about.

The perpetually scowling kitty, whose real name is Tardar Sauce, has been awarded a cool $710,000 in a copyright infringement case. Or at least her human, Tabatha Bundesen, has.