(Photo courtesy CHP)

CHP Says Man Struck, Killed On Highway 101 In Ventura County Had Dementia

CHP investigators say a man with dementia apparently wandered onto Highway 101 in Ventura County, where he was struck and killed. The body of the 68 year old man was discovered just after 7 a.m. Tuesday on the center divider of the northbound 101 near Rancho Road in Thousand Oaks. His name hasn’t been released yet, and an autopsy is still pending. Officers say evidence at the scene indicates the man might have been struck by a Toyota which didn’t stop, so they are looking with a vehicle with...

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California Coast News

(Photo courtesy CHP)

CHP investigators say a man with dementia apparently wandered onto Highway 101 in Ventura County, where he was struck and killed.

The body of the 68 year old man was discovered just after 7 a.m. Tuesday on the center divider of the northbound 101 near Rancho Road in Thousand Oaks. His name hasn’t been released yet, and an autopsy is still pending.

Officers say evidence at the scene indicates the man might have been struck by a Toyota which didn’t stop, so they are looking with a vehicle with front end damage.

A judge has denied efforts by the company which owns the pipeline which caused the big 2015 Santa Barbara County oil spill to dismiss criminal charges stemming from the accident.

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LA’s chances of getting the 2024 Summer Olympics appear to be improving, with one of the two other competing cities on the verge of dropping its bid for the games.

A Hungarian political group has gathered more than 250,000 signatures to force a referendum on the issue, and organizers in Budapest have suspended their campaign to get the games. Observers say they could completely drop their bid this week, leaving just LA and Paris as contenders. But, if LA gets the Games, the South Coast could be left out if it.

(Photo courtesy CHP/Moorpark Office)

Authorities are trying to figure out what led to the death of a 68 year old man whose body was found on Highway 101 in Ventura County.

Just after 7 a.m. Tuesday, motorists spotted the body in the center divider of the northbound lanes of the highway near Rancho Road in Thousand Oaks. The freeway’s fast lane was closed for much of the morning as a result of the investigation, resulting in traffic backups.

It reopened at about noon. Investigators haven’t released the name of the man.

Authorities are investigating a gruesome find on Highway 101 in Ventura County.

Just after 7 a.m. Tuesday, motorists spotted a body in the center divider of the northbound lanes of the highway near Rancho Road in Thousand Oaks.

The freeway’s fast lane was closed for much of the morning as a result of the investigation, resulting in traffic backups. There’s no word on the identity of the person, or what investigators think may have occurred.

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