Scientists Work on Rare Mammoth Skull at South Coast Museum in Public View

The Channel Islands are famous for the tiny island fox. But, did you know that they were also home to mammoths – weighing anywhere from 2,000 to 20,000 pounds? Researchers are now preserving a rare mammoth fossil that was discovered on the Channel Islands, and you can get a firsthand look as they try to learn more about it.

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California Coast News

Photo by David Hubbard

Last season’s El Nino didn’t bring a lot of rain to Southern California. But, a UC Santa Barbara researcher says it may a have actually been one of the most powerful climate events in the last 150 years.

Ecologist David Hubbard with UCSB’s Marine Science Institute is among a team of researchers who examined the 2015/2016 El Nino and its impact on beach erosion of the Pacific Coast. The results were astonishing.

“The erosion was 76% higher than normal. Most of the beaches in California eroded beyond their historic extremes.”

Scientists collected data from 29 beaches along more than 1,200 miles of coastline.

Residents who live near an old nuclear testing and rocket lab facility in Ventura County displayed mixed views at a hearing over the weekend on proposals for a cleanup.

The U.S. Department of Energy released a Draft Environmental Impact Statement that included several plans to remove pollution from nearly 500 acres of land east and northeast of the Santa Susana Field Lab, and the public was invited to weigh-in on Saturday in Simi Valley.

While some residents say they’re pleased with cleanup efforts, others used the hearing to voice their opposition.

Photo by Ventura County Sheriff's Department

Rescue crews have located the body of a man who may have been swept away by heavy flooding in the Conejo Valley.

Ventura County Sheriff’s detectives say around 8:45 Saturday morning, officials in a sheriff’s helicopter and swift water rescuers found the body in a remote area of the Arroyo Conejo Creek in Thousand Oaks. The man has not yet been identified.

Crews have been searching for a man in his 20s who was swept away Friday afternoon by fast-moving water when heavy rainfall flooded the barranca area near the 1200 block of Camino Dos Rios in Thousand Oaks. Just after 2 p.m., they rescued three people who were stranded within the barranca, and they told authorities that a fourth man had been swept away by the water.

Photo by Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Office

A South Coast airport and a major highway reopens, but some flooding issues persist as the storm tapers off on Saturday.

The Santa Barbara Airport -- that had to shut down Saturday afternoon because part of its main runway flooded -- has reopened. Officials say runways were reopened to all aircraft at 7:30 a.m. Saturday, but travelers are warned that standing water is still an issue on roads leading to the airport.

A portion of Highway 101 on the South Coast, which was closed for more than six hours by storm flooding on Friday afternoon, is finally open.

Three people were rescued, but the search is continuing for a fourth person who was swept away when heavy rainfall quickly flooded a barranca area in the Conejo Valley.

Ventura County Sheriff’s deputies, firefighters, a Search and Rescue team and a helicopter responded to a call of some people stranded by high water on the 1200 block of Camino Dos Rios in Thousand Oaks just after 2 p.m. Friday.

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Santa Barbara Family's Heirloom From World War II Japanese Internment Camp In Smithsonian Exhibition

This is a story about a pair of sandals. They aren’t just any sandals. To a Santa Barbara man, they are the symbols of an unjust ordeal his family went through 75 years ago, an ordeal they faced just because of their Japanese ancestry. Now those sandals are in Washington, D.C. at the Smithsonian Institution, as is Mike Takeuchi, whose grandfather made them, and whose father owned them. The story of the sandals begins in the days following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Fear of a West...

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KCLU Honored At The Golden Mike Awards

We're once again the big Golden Mikes Award winner on the Central and South Coasts, with five awards for news excellence by the Radio Television News Association of Southern California.

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

On Sunday, former Uber engineer Susan Fowler Rigetti published a post on her blog entitled "Reflecting On One Very, Very Strange Year At Uber." On her first day working on her new team at Uber, Rigetti says, her manager sent her a string of messages propositioning her on the company chat. She says she took screenshots of the conversations, and brought them to Uber's HR department, saying she expected the matter would be handled quickly and appropriately. And from her account, it was not.

Speaking at NATO headquarters in Brussels Monday, Vice President Mike Pence reassured allies that America would uphold its commitments to the organization, but added that President Trump expected "real progress" among NATO allies in stepping up their defense spending.

Defense Secretary James Mattis arrived in Iraq Monday on an unannounced visit that seemed aimed to reassure Iraqi allies. He told reporters that, despite President Trump's earlier statements to the contrary, the U.S. does not plan to seize Iraqi oil.

"All of us in America have generally paid for our gas and oil all along and I'm sure that we will continue to do so in the future," Mattis said. "We're not in Iraq to seize anybody's oil."

An "atmospheric river" is a colorful term for a sinuous plume of moisture that travels up from the tropics — a single plume can carry more water than the Mississippi River at its mouth. But new research shows that atmospheric rivers are also among the most damaging weather systems around.

The atmospheric rivers that soaked California this winter did some good — they ended an epic drought in the state.

Sitting inside a glass-encased cockpit, two men fiddle with joysticks controlling giant claws outside. They look like they're playing at a vending machine at a mall, where you try to grasp a stuffed animal. But these are engineers. The claws they're manipulating are as big as houses, and they're sifting through hundreds of tons of garbage thrown away by the world's largest consumer class.

About 13 years ago, The Alchemist brewery in Waterbury, Vt., released a new IPA called Heady Topper. The brewer, John Kimmich, had decided to neither filter nor pasteurize the beer — both common methods of extending a commercial beer's shelf life. The result was an IPA thicker with the microscopic compounds and particulates that add flavor and aroma. Customers noticed and praised the beer as being especially tasty.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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