Thomas Fire At 230,000 Acres Burned; Firefighters Could Soon Get Help From Weather

Firefighters are hoping to get some help from the weather as they work to control a 230,000 acre brush fire in Ventura and Santa Barbara Counties which has destroyed hundreds of homes. The week long blaze has been fueled by Santa Ana winds, and low humidity, But, Red Flag alerts for dangerous weather conditions are expected to end Monday night.

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California Coast News

Firefighters are hoping to get some help from the weather as they work to control a 230,000 acre brush fire in Ventura and Santa Barbara Counties which has destroyed hundreds of homes.

The week long blaze has been fueled by Santa Ana winds, and low humidity, But, Red Flag alerts for dangerous weather conditions are expected to end Monday night.

We’re getting more details on the number of homes lost to the Thomas blaze, and the figure continues to climb.

The size, and rapid movement of the fire made it difficult for firefighters to get an accurate read at first of how many structures were destroyed or damaged.

The latest numbers show that 644 single family homes were destroyed, and 167 damaged. An additional 138 structures like carports and outbuilding also burned in the blaze. Many of the homes which were lost were in the City of Ventura, and most of the losses were in Ventura County.

As the massive Thomas brush fire has continued to grow in Ventura and Santa Barbara Counties, it’s impacted more and more lives.

KCLU’s Lance Orozco reports people at a Carpinteria shopping plaza were comparing notes with friends and neighbors about the crisis, and what they think will happen next.

The Albertson’s parking lot off of Casitas Pass Road in Carpinteria was jammed with cars Sunday, even though some of the businesses like Starbucks were closed due to fire related power outages.

Photo by Ventura County Fire Department

There’s a way you can support the victims of the Thomas Fire that has charred Ventura and Santa Barbara counties.

The United Way of Ventura County has set up the Thomas Fire Fund in which 100% of donations will support those impacted by the massive wildfire.

The huge Thomas brush fire burning in Ventura and Santa Barbara Counties continues to mushroom in size, passing the 230,000 acre market and triggering yet more evacuation orders.

The fire burned tens of thousands of acres in less than 24 hours as it pushed west.  Firefighters say some of the fuel in the mountains above Carpinteria and Summerland hasn't burned for decades.  The fire dropped from 15% to 10% containment.

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Beachfront Homeowners In Ventura County Have Not Just One, But Two Close Calls From Thomas Fire

One of the big hot spots for Southern California’s 115,000 acre Thomas brush fire yesterday was a tiny beachfront community between Ventura and Santa Barbara which survived the flames not just once, but twice. Harrison Stroud opened the front door to his beachfront home west of Ventura, and saw 40’ high flames across the highway from the house.

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Community Resources for the Thomas Fire

A list of resources available to those who have been or may be affected by the Thomas Fire.

Firefighters are hoping to get some help from the weather as they work to control a 230,000 acre brush fire in Ventura and Santa Barbara Counties which has destroyed hundreds of homes.

The week long blaze has been fueled by Santa Ana winds, and low humidity, But, Red Flag alerts for dangerous weather conditions are expected to end Monday night.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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