(Photo by Mike Eliason, Santa Barbara County Fire Department)

One Week After Flooding In Santa Barbara County, Numbers Show 115 Homes Destroyed; FEMA Offering Aid

One week after Southern Santa Barbara County was hit by massive flooding, the death toll remains at 20 people, with three still missing. Highway 101 remains closed, as crews work around the clock to remove mud and debris. Earth movers are rumbling through the Montecito, Summerland, and Carpinteria areas as they claw through mountains of mud, and debris.

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California Coast News

(Photo by Mike Eliason, Santa Barbara County Fire Department)

One week after Southern Santa Barbara County was hit by massive flooding, the death toll remains at 20 people, with three still missing.

Highway 101 remains closed, as crews work around the clock to remove mud and debris. Earth movers are rumbling through the Montecito, Summerland, and Carpinteria areas as they claw through mountains of mud, and debris.

Coast Village Road businesses owners looking for relief are organizing this week.

They plan to meet with attorneys familiar with FEMA at their impact hub offices, January 16, 23 and 25 at 117 State St.

(Photo by Mike Eliason, Santa Barbara County Fire Department)

Tuesday marks a week since the rain pounded Santa Barbara’s front country, sending torrents of water into Montecito and causing deadly flooding.

The death toll stands at 20, with three still missing. Search and recovery efforts are continuing.

28 people were treated for injuries at South Coast hospitals, with seven still being treated, and two in critical condition. The latest numbers show that more than 110 homes were destroyed, and more than 240 houses damaged.

The Red Cross shelter for evacuees from Santa Barbara County’s flooding has been moved.

The shelter had been Santa Barbara City College, but Monday it was shifted to the cafeteria at San Marcos High School in Goleta.

Meanwhile, a community meeting on the flooding is set to take place at 4 p.m. Tuesday at La Cumbre Junior High School in Santa Barbara.

(Photo by Mike Eliason, Santa Barbara County Fire Department)

The search continues in Santa Barbara County for victims of last week’s flooding, but there is little hope of finding additional survivors.

The death toll remains at 20 today, with three still missing. It turns out a fourth person on the list Sunday wasn’t even in Montecito at the time of the storm. Santa Barbara County Sheriff’s Department officials say John Keating is a transient who was in Carpinteria when the storm hit. He was found safe in Ventura.

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(Photo by Mike Eliason, Santa Barbara County Fire Department)

People Talk About Emotions Of Experiencing Deadly Santa Barbara County Flooding

Tuesday marks a week since the rain pounded Santa Barbara’s front country, sending torrents of water into Montecito and causing deadly flooding. The death toll stands at 20, with three still missing. Search and recovery efforts are continuing. 28 people were treated for injuries at South Coast hospitals, with seven still being treated, and two in critical condition. The latest numbers show that more than 110 homes were destroyed, and more than 240 houses damaged.

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Names Released Of Montecito Residents Who Died In January 9th Flooding

Authorities have released the names of the 20 people known to have been fatally injured in the January 9th flooding in Santa Barbara County.

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(Photo by Mike Eliason, Santa Barbara County Fire Department)

One week after Southern Santa Barbara County was hit by massive flooding, the death toll remains at 20 people, with three still missing.

Highway 101 remains closed, as crews work around the clock to remove mud and debris. Earth movers are rumbling through the Montecito, Summerland, and Carpinteria areas as they claw through mountains of mud, and debris.

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As the prospect of a long-term immigration deal for young people who were brought to the country illegally as children dwindles, the Justice Department is appealing a court ruling that blocked the Trump administration from ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.

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