Pair Of Quakes Rock Section Of South Coast

A pair of small earthquakes rocked parts of the South Coast. A magnitude 2.4 quake, followed by a magnitude 3.3 quake occurred Wednesday night off the Southern Santa Barbara County coastline. The first quake occurred at 8:18 p.m., and the second at 8:49. Both were centered in the Pacific Ocean about 17 miles west of Isla Vista. Hundreds of people reported feeling the larger of the quakes, the magnitude 3.3 temblor. There were no reports of injuries, or damage.

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California Coast News

An incident that began with a reported reckless driver turned into a major chase Wednesday.

Police in Santa Barbara said the driver had pulled over at about 5:30, but then took off.

The car was went south on the freeway at speeds of up to 90 miles per hour, both on the shoulder and in and out of traffic.

(Photo by John Palminteri)

Authorities are investigating the death of a man who was hit by a train at a South Coast train station.

Witnesses told police that a man appeared to be trying to cross railroad tracks just as a passenger train was arriving at Santa Barbara’s train station last night.

The man was pronounced dead at the scene. His name hasn’t been released yet.

A pair of small earthquakes rocked parts of the South Coast.

A magnitude 2.4 quake, followed by a magnitude 3.3 quake occurred Wednesday night off the Southern Santa Barbara County coastline. The first quake occurred at 8:18 p.m., and the second at 8:49.

Both were centered in the Pacific Ocean about 17 miles west of Isla Vista. Hundreds of people reported feeling the larger of the quakes, the magnitude 3.3 temblor. There were no reports of injuries, or damage.

The persecution and murder of Jews during World War II is a difficult, but well documented part of history. But, what isn’t as well known is what happened to some other minority groups.

Professor Samuel Torvend, with Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma, is studying Nazi Germany’s persecution of sexual minorities, especially gay men. The researcher, who’s speaking on the South Coast Thursday night, says it’s a largely forgotten part of history.

(Photo by Mike Eliason, Santa Barbara County Fire Department)

Santa Barbara County officials say last week’s storm caused more than seven million dollars in damage in the county, prompting them to declare a local emergency.

The move, which County Supervisors will be asked to formally ratify next Tuesday, could open the door to state and federal aid. County officials say the new damage comes on top of seven million dollars in damage from storms in January.

Roads and highways were damaged, trees were knocked down, and the Goleta Pier was hit hard, and is closed pending repairs.

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