Science & Technology

Science news

Girls Who Code: Is There A Wave Coming?

Jun 26, 2018

Ten large tech companies did not employ a single black woman in 2016, according to a new report from The Center for Investigative Reporting.

Even after “Lean In,” written by Facebook chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg, Silicon Valley can still be hostile to women, and women are still diverted from STEM careers. Why?

The city of Orlando, Fla., says it has ended a pilot program in which its police force used Amazon's real-time facial recognition — a system called "Rekognition" that had triggered complaints from rights and privacy groups when its use was revealed earlier this year.

Updated 1:57 p.m. ET, June 26 with a statement from the Canadian government.

Escaped Macaw Is Returned To Omaha Zoo

Jun 26, 2018

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Once, the sky was full of stories. Ancient cultures filled the heavens with heroes and monsters, and spent nights telling epics and memorizing patterns in the stars.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Tick bites can cause all sorts of nasty afflictions. And if you're bitten by a Lone Star tick, here's one more to add to the list: a red meat allergy.

Laura Stirling, 51, a Realtor who lives in Severna Park, Md., was diagnosed with the allergy last year. She got a tick bite while walking on a trail with her dog, Gunner, near her home.

"I found [the tick] 3 or 4 inches to the left of my hip bone," Stirling recalls. At the time, she say, she didn't think much of it. "I just took it off and threw it away."

Dozens of Ventura County middle and high school girls spent a large part of their weekend doing computer coding. 

The Ventura County Office of Education organized this Hackathon by the Sea that took place Friday evening and all day Saturday at its education center in Moorpark. It was geared towards getting girls excited about computer science.

Some Animals Switching To Nocturnal Life

Jun 24, 2018

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SUSAN DAVIS, HOST:

Few species manipulate their surroundings enough to make big ecological changes. Humans are one. Beavers are another.

Robert Edgell has grown accustomed to seeing bald eagles soar over the family farm in Federalsburg, Md., so, when he discovered the carcasses of more than a dozen dead raptors on the property two years ago, he "was dumbfounded," he told The Washington Post.

"Usually you see one or two soaring over the place, but to see 13 in that area and all deceased. ... In all my years, I'd not seen anything like this," Edgell said.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

In a ruling seen as a major victory for privacy rights in the digital age, the U.S. Supreme Court this morning has ruled that police need a search warrant to track people's cellphone locations. For more on what this means, we're joined by NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg. Nina, thanks for being here.

NINA TOTENBERG, BYLINE: My pleasure.

MARTIN: On its face, this seems like a highly consequential ruling.

Updated at 5:32 p.m. ET

In a landmark decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Friday that police must obtain a search warrant to access an individual's cellphone location information. The 5-4 decision imposes new limits on law enforcement's ability to get at the increasing amount of data that private companies amass in the modern technological age.

Updated at 10:45 a.m. ET Friday

Just in time for the hot, humid, bug-bite-riddled summer: Researchers from the University of Florida have confirmed the first known case of a human infected with the mosquito-borne Keystone virus.

A 16-year-old boy in North Central Florida went to an urgent care clinic after coming down with a fever and a severe rash in August 2016, during the Zika outbreak in Florida and the Caribbean.

Doctors couldn't figure out what made him sick. They tested for Zika and various other pathogens but hit a series of dead ends.

Opportunity, phone home!

NASA scientists are still holding out hope they will hear from the surprisingly long-lived Mars rover. It went into snooze mode earlier this month, thanks to a gargantuan dust storm on the Red Planet that's blocking beams from reaching the solar panels that recharge the rover's batteries.

Pages