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You can't find a more intimate relationship between humans, food and nature than fishing, says Michele Mesmain, international coordinator of Slow Fish, a seafood spinoff of the Italy-based Slow Food movement. Think of all the thousands of boats at sea, catching wild creatures to haul back to shore and eat. "It's our last source of widely eaten, truly wild food," she says.

When you really need help, Siri might not always be there for you. And if you told the Google App or S Voice from Samsung that you were just sexually assaulted or beaten by your partner, they don't have much to offer, a study finds.

In game 4 of a best-of-five match between Google's AlphaGo program and master Go player Lee Sedol, Lee has notched a victory.

The artificial intelligence program, which won the first three games, still wins the match. But Lee has ensured that it won't be a clean sweep.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Hey, guys. Kind of a rough political season, huh? Makes you long for a simpler time, like, I don't know, 1996 maybe? "Jerry Maguire" was the big movie.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "JERRY MAGUIRE")

TOM CRUISE: (As Jerry Maguire) Show me the money.

One dog has been killed and multiple dogs have been injured by a snowmobiler in what appears to be an intentional attack on competitors in the Iditarod Race in Alaska.

Iditarod veteran Aliy Zirkle was the first to report an attack.

A snowmachiner had "repeatedly attempted to harm her and her team," the Iditarod Trail Committee says, and one of Zirkle's dogs had received a non-life-threatening injury.

Zirkle reported the attack when she arrived in Nulato, Alaska, in the wee hours of the morning, and race officials and law enforcement were notified.

Ladies and gentlemen, start your tiny, tiny engines.

A roller-coaster-esque race course in Dubai hosted the World Drone Prix on Friday and Saturday — a contest for drone racers and manufacturers, with a $250,000 prize for the winning team.

Yesterday, NASA announced that astronaut Scott Kelly will retire from the space agency as of April 1st. Kelly holds the U.S. record for the most time spent in space.

For nearly a full year, he zoomed along at 17,500 miles per hour — orbiting 230 miles above earth — on the International Space Station. And for those million or so of us who follow him on Twitter, Cmdr. Kelly's year in space gave us a mind-expanding view of planet Earth.

Kelly posted spectacular photos — awesome, in the true sense of the word. He called them, earth-art.

President Obama was in Austin, Texas on Friday to make peace with techies. He addressed attendees at the annual tech conference South by Southwest Interactive and asked for help getting Americans more civically engaged. But he also spoke for the first time at length about issues in the stand off between the Justice Department and Apple over a terrorist's iPhone.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

A Google A.I. program has beaten a master Go player — not once, not twice, but three times, clinching the best-of-five match between a computer and a human playing a notoriously complex game.

Lee Sedol, a 9-dan professional player considered to be one of the world's top Go players, expressed stunned resignation at the post-game press conference.

Recently returned from a groundbreaking 340-day space mission, astronaut Scott Kelly announced Friday he will retire from NASA on April 1, but still continue to participate in research related to his space travel.

In his wide-ranging keynote interview at South by Southwest, the music, film and tech festival in Austin, Texas, President Obama focused on technology's role in civic life.

Obama, who was interviewed by Evan Smith, editor of the Texas Tribune, cited low voter turnout as an area in which technology could improve citizens' participation in government. He said it was "easier to order a pizza than to vote" and said we need to think about how to "redesign our systems so that we don't have 50 percent or 55 percent voter participation in presidential elections."

Mountain lion P-22, who dwells in the hills around Los Angeles, has a substantial fan following.

But then again, so do koalas.

And that might put animal lovers in a bit of a tight spot — because P-22 is the prime suspect in a koala killing.

Killarney, a 14-year-old female koala at the Los Angeles Zoo, went missing on March 3.

Staff members immediately set out in search of her, the zoo says — but found only, well, parts.

The zoo can't prove that P-22 did the deed. But they have their suspicions ...

Nevada's home solar business is in turmoil as the state's Public Utilities Commission starts to phase out incentives for homeowners who install rooftop solar panels. Some of the largest solar companies have stopped seeking new business in the state and laid off hundreds of workers.

A controversy over a secretly installed data monitoring system is simmering at university campuses across California.

Last summer, hackers broke into the computer network at the UCLA medical center. A few months later, the University of California system's president quietly ordered a new security system to monitor Internet traffic on all UC campuses.

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