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Tanzania Gears Up To Become A Nation Of Medical Drones

21 minutes ago

Eight-year-old boy bitten by dog. Two-year-old child with severe anemia. Mother, age 24, bleeding severely at childbirth.

Entries like these popped up as Keller Rinaudo browsed a database of health emergencies during a 2014 visit to Tanzania. It was "a lightbulb moment," says the CEO and co-founder of the California drone startup Zipline.

The Justice Department is dropping the most controversial part of its demand for records relating to a website used to coordinate protests during the presidential inauguration.

In court filings submitted yesterday, ahead of a hearing Thursday in D.C. Superior Court, the government suggests modifications to the warrant it attained for files from web hosting company DreamHost, which hosted the website DisruptJ20.org.

The hashtag is 10! Yes, the symbol that started out as the lowly "number sign" or "pound" on the telephone keypad and later morphed into something entirely different is 10 years old today. And it has accomplished quite a lot. In fact, it's hard to imagine modern communication without it.

And you might think it was all by design. That the folks running Twitter needed a catchy little tool to help their new platform catch fire, and the hashtag is what they came up with.

But that's not the way it happened.

With an eye on the future of online retailing, Walmart and Google are teaming up to go after rival Amazon in a play that also targets the growing market for voice-activated shopping.

Starting next month, Walmart customers will be able to access hundreds of thousands of products from the company's shelves — everything from dishwashing soap to dining tables — via the online retailing service Google Express. Until now, Walmart's enormous inventory was available online only through the company's own website.

This has been quite a space week for Americans.

After Monday's stunning solar eclipse, Wednesday night PBS will air its two-hour documentary film about the two Voyager missions, launched 40 years ago. The Farthest: Voyager In Space, celebrates a technological and intellectual achievement rarely matched in history. Two small, nuclear-powered spacecraft have traveled farther than any other man-made machine and have forever changed our views of the solar system — and our place in it.

Following the violence in Charlottesville, Va., Silicon Valley tech firms removed far-right groups from search results, cut off their websites and choked their ability to raise money online.

The moves have leaders on the far-right calling for the government to step in and regulate these companies. They have some strange bedfellows in this — many liberals also are calling for more regulation of the same companies.

On the far-right is Richard Spencer. He is a white supremacist.

Photo by UC Santa Barbara

New research by a South Coast economist is finding that it’s unlikely that global temperatures goals laid out in the Paris Climate Agreement will be achieved.

The goal in the agreement is to limit temperature rise by the year 2100 to two degrees Celsius, which amounts to 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit.

UC Santa Barbara economics professor Dick Startz and his colleagues created a high-tech statistical model that looked at every country.

Six years after a fatal crash caused China to throttle back its high-speed rail service, the country is relaunching the world's fastest inter-city lines, including one between Beijing and Shanghai that cuts an hour off the current travel time.

The operating speed of the new bullet trains, known as "Fuxing," or "Rejuvenation," will be 217 mph, according to Chinese media.

Editor's note Aug. 23: This page has been updated to correct and clarify some things reported about AdhereTech. Scroll down to the "corrections" box at the bottom of this page for details about what has been changed.

What if I told you there was a way to use technology to save an estimated $100 billion to $300 billion dollars a year in health care spending in the U.S.? That's the estimated cost incurred because people don't take the medications they're prescribed.

How Did The Chicken Safely Cross The Road?

Aug 22, 2017

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Less than an hour after the Great American Eclipse completed its coast-to-coast show on Monday, people's fascination with the sun and the moon quickly turned to concern about their eyes.

We're hoping all you Shots readers heeded our words of caution and wore eclipse glasses or enjoyed the show indirectly.

Eclipses are among the most predictable events on the planet. This one was known about for many decades before it crossed the U.S. earlier Monday.

Accordingly, people had been planning eclipse road trips for weeks in advance. They piled into planes and cars and made their way to the 70-mile-wide swath of land where the total eclipse would be visible. They checked online calculators, which told them the time of totality down to the second.

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One of the biggest companies on earth is basically a headless beast right now. We're talking about Uber on this week's All Tech Considered.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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And now another moment from today's total eclipse of the sun. Here are Carlyn (ph), Steven (ph) and 3-year-old Grace Meyer (ph) in Russellville, Ky.

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KEVIN BUNCH: Hello, this is Kevin Bunch (ph). I was in Lebanon, Tenn., for the eclipse, came down here to get married.

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NPR listeners are sharing their stories of the eclipse today.

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And now another moment from the eclipse.

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Updated at 3:49 p.m. ET

As the solar eclipse made its way from the West Coast to the East Coast, NASA shared its expertise live.

Eclipse Map: Tracking The Astronomical Show

Aug 21, 2017

Updated at 3:47 p.m. ET

The United States was treated to a solar eclipse Monday, but where you were in the country affected whether you saw a total eclipse or a partial one. The map reflects the time zone you're in.

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In a televised address tonight, President Trump plans to lay out his strategy for Afghanistan.

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Photo by Arne Danielson, NASA

One of the most spectacular scientific phenomena can be seen later this morning. It’s the long-awaited total solar eclipse.

The sun will be completely blocked by the moon for about two and a half minutes, and darkness will set in.

“This is the first time since 1776 that a total eclipse has happened within the United States and only the United States,” said astrophysicist Andy Howell with the Las Cumbres Observatory in Goleta.

By now you likely know an eclipse is happening Monday, Aug. 21. There have been countless stories about the celestial event, how to view it, the science behind it and hotels that were booked more than a year in advance. But even with all that coverage, you might not have heard details about a small town in deep Southern Illinois that is expected to almost triple in size just for the eclipse.

Words You'll Hear: Eclipse Cheap Seats

Aug 20, 2017

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And finally, yesterday, we asked you to contribute to our solar eclipse soundtrack. Here's what you came up with.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "THAT'S AMORE")

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Kids Learn What It Takes To Be An Astronaut

Aug 19, 2017

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One last camp visit this summer - summer camp - space camp at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Ala., where youngsters from all over the world go to learn what it takes to be an astronaut. Melanie Peeples has more.

Brace yourselves, North America — we're about to get mooned. Or, more accurately, eclipsed.

The day of the long-awaited coast-to-coast solar eclipse has arrived — and if history is any guide, it's likely that somebody's eyes are going to get hurt.

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