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There's a cycle that starts when the snow melts and the earth thaws high in Colorado's Rocky Mountains. It's a seasonal cycle based on timing and temperature, two variables that climate change is pushing increasingly out of sync.

To the outsider, it can be hard to see: Plants still grow, flowers bud, bears awake, and marmots breed. Broad-tailed hummingbirds still trill around a landscape that evokes the opening scene of The Sound of Music, with flowery meadows and granite peaks.

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Russian Influence Operations

Jul 21, 2018

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'Meddling' Vs. Information Warfare

Jul 21, 2018

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Looking At Russian Social Media Influence

Jul 21, 2018

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The cows were silent on a recent July morning at Mill-King dairy farm in McGregor, Texas. They stood under shade trees, digesting their breakfast, while cicadas buzzed in the branches overhead.

"It's starting to warm up, so they're starting to get a little bit less ... frolicky," says Craig Miller, watching from the fence line.

His grandfather started this farm. Now he runs it, producing nonhomogenized milk from a mostly grass-fed herd. He says this cow behavior is exactly what he expects as the temperature rises.

It's a haunting image. At dusk, hundreds of Rohingya refugees at a camp in Bangladesh are huddled around a projector, looking at something just outside the frame — a film about health and sanitation.

That photo, taken on an iPhone by documentary photographer Jashim Salam of Bangladesh, is the grand prize-winning photo of the 2018 iPhone Photography Awards.

Empathy is an important part of nursing that’s difficult to teach. But now nursing students on the South Coast are using technology to learn how to empathize with their patients. Virtual reality is helping students step in their patients’ shoes.

The United Kingdom is counting its butterflies today — and will keep going for the next three weeks.

The ninth annual Big Butterfly Campaign kicks off today, with a big boost from a legendary voice.

"I did it in my garden," Sir David Attenborough intoned. "Where are you going to do yours?"

The ask is simple: Anybody in the U.K. can download an app or print out a chart that shows pictures of common butterflies.

With less than four months to go, how much are this year's midterm elections at risk for the kind of interference sowed by Russia in 2016?

Counting cats, much like herding them, is a complicated proposition.

But a coalition of groups in Washington, D.C., is giving it a shot.

PetSmart Charities, the Humane Society, the Humane Rescue Alliance and the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute are collaborating on a project called the D.C. Cat Count, which aims to create a more accurate estimate of the city's entire cat population — both feral cats and pet cats.

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There's a fresh controversy for Facebook. Yesterday in an interview with the podcast Recode, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said Holocaust deniers should be allowed to express their opinion on the social media platform.

Each spring, barnacle geese migrate more than 1,800 miles from the Netherlands and northern Germany to their breeding grounds in parts of Russia above the Arctic Circle.

The journey north usually takes about a month, and the geese make multiple stops along the way to eat and fatten up before they lay their eggs, says Bart Nolet of the Netherlands Institute of Ecology and the University of Amsterdam.

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