Arts & Culture

Arts & culture

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If you've spent any time on the Internet this past week, you've probably heard and then argued over a certain viral sound clip.

He's saying, "Laurel," some people swear. No, he's saying, "Yanny," others insist. But for Broadway and television actor Jay Aubrey Jones, he hears himself.

Bernard "Pretty" Purdie is on the shortlist of the hardest-working drummers in the history of recorded music. The list of artists he's worked with, on the other hand, is quite long: Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Dizzy Gillespie, Lloyd Price, James Brown, Steely Dan — on and on stretching back to 1962. On many of those recordings, you can hear a triplet rhythm that's come to be known as the Purdie Shuffle.

Film-Loving 'Twinkle' Is A Star On The Page

6 hours ago

April 6, 2018

Living Room. Space Coast, Florida

The basics:

Name: Alethea Kontis

Occupation: Author. Actress. Narrator. Nerd. Book Reviewer. Fairy Tale Ranter. Princess General of the Resistance.

Crush: Sebastian Stan. (Since Jefferson in Once Upon a Time.)

I belong to a generation of Americans for whom the idea of not only a royal wedding but a royal marriage was largely established by Charles and Diana, the Prince and Princess of Wales. Their staid ceremony and their seemingly joyless marriage (aside from the births of their children) made marrying into the royal family look less like a fantasy than like a march into oblivion — a grudgingly accepted transformation into a wealthy but hollowed-out target for photographers hoping to catch you at your worst.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The Johnstown Flood is one of history's great tragedies. More than 2,200 people died in May of 1889 when 20 tons of turgid waters, teeming with debris of houses, trees and drowned animals, unleashed a biblical flood in the middle of Pennsylvania.

Tom Wolfe did not blend in. He was a southerner in New York, a New Yorker in the world, a reporter among novelists and vice-versa, and a man who wore ice cream white suits and peach-pink ties in artistic circles where men and women often wore black with occasional splashes of gray.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

A piece by the artist Kerry James Marshall was auctioned off this week and became the highest selling piece by a living black artist. "Past Times," which is part painting and part collage, features black people relaxing, boating, playing croquet along a river.

Also in that auction were works by Andy Warhol and Franz Kline — they were being sold by the Baltimore Museum of Art, which is planning to use the money from the sales to acquire more pieces specifically by women and artists of color (and maybe their own version of a Kerry James Marshall.)

Aja Gabel's new novel has music cues for each new section. One of them is for Antonin Dvorak's "American" String Quartet in F, Op. 96, No. 12, which is performed in the opening of the book.

It's a love story, the famous violinist had said, and even though Jana knew it was not, those were the words that knocked around her brain when she began to play on stage.

Foods that contains genetically modified ingredients will soon have a special label.

We recently got the first glimpse of what that label might look like, when the U.S. Department of Agriculture released its proposed guidelines.

Michael Kupperman is a very funny guy.

He didn't get that from his dad.

Kupperman fils' comics — many of which gleefully slam together characters and media that should have nothing to do with each other, then comb through the resulting iconographic rubble to find bizarrely hilarious affinities — have appeared in scores of magazines, newspapers and books. He's written five books of his own that adopt that same approach, resulting in mixed-media mashups of vintage photography enlivened by Kupperman's expressive linework and slyly surreal wit.

Missed the festivities? Not to worry. With the assistance of English breakfast tea and freshly made cucumber sandwiches, we live-blogged the royal wedding ceremony from this page.

Updated at 9:01 a.m. ET

According to Kensington Palace, Queen Elizabeth II will give a lunchtime reception for 600 guests at St. George's Hall in Windsor Castle on Saturday. The wedding cake, along with a selection of canapés and "bowl food," will be served.

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