uc santa barbara

Sometimes it’s hard to imagine that the fruits and vegetables you eat don’t start out at the supermarket. Instead, they begin with a seed. You could take an entire college course on how a seed turns into what ends up on your dinner plate. But, this course is being taught to an unusually young audience on the South Coast.

Preschoolers – ages three to five – are learning about gardening, sustainability, eating healthy and the environment.

Photo by David Hubbard

Last season’s El Nino didn’t bring a lot of rain to Southern California. But, a UC Santa Barbara researcher says it may a have actually been one of the most powerful climate events in the last 150 years.

Ecologist David Hubbard with UCSB’s Marine Science Institute is among a team of researchers who examined the 2015/2016 El Nino and its impact on beach erosion of the Pacific Coast. The results were astonishing.

“The erosion was 76% higher than normal. Most of the beaches in California eroded beyond their historic extremes.”

Scientists collected data from 29 beaches along more than 1,200 miles of coastline.

Nearly all of the players on the UC Santa Barbara women's basketball team are not standing during the national anthem, and are instead going down on one knee.

It's a statement similar to professional athletes who are concerned about racial injustice.

Students at University of California campuses rallied Monday against possible tuition increases next year.

UC Santa Barbara students also took part, where students say currently their in state tuition is $12,240 a year.

ScienceLine

Kids in the Tri-Counties who are curious about anything science-related can get their answers from real-life scientists.

It’s called ScienceLine. It’s a website in which students and teachers from local elementary, middle and high schools submit science questions, and UC Santa Barbara scientists answer them.

“It’s a good way to encourage kids not only to learn science but to develop curiosity and think about how to do science,” UCSB Emeritus bio-physics professor Helen Hansma said. 

Oxfam International

Researchers on the South Coast are helping African scientists stave off starvation.

Geographers with the UC Santa Barbara and the U.S. Geological Survey’s Climate Hazards Group will be using remote sensing and climate data to predict poor harvests so that they can mitigate them and prevent severe hunger.

(Carlos Diniz Archives)

The World Trade Center in New York, the Pacific Design Center in West Hollywood, The Century City Shopping Plaza, and the Walt Disney Concert Hall were among his projects.

Closer to home in the 1960’s, Carlos Diniz worked on the master plan for Westlake Village.

A local computer scientist is bringing technology from her lab into the fields to create smarter and more sustainable farming. 

Chandra Krintz grew up on a small farm in rural Indiana. Now, as a UC Santa Barbara professor, she’s co-leading a team of scientists and students to develop a tech-based system called SmartFarm. 

Over a thousand new rooms are going in around the intersection of Storke Road and El Colegio in Isla Vista where more student housing is going up in the form of high rise buildings.

It's right across the street from adult student housing and the Isla Vista Elementary school, and because many people walk in that area, residents are concerned about pedestrian safety around the busy intersection.

There may be new money available for coastal projects ranging from a nature center to land preservation over looking the ocean. 

A funding source from oil development off Santa Barbara County will be divided soon.

It's called the Coastal Resource Enhancement Fund, or CREF.