Merrit Kennedy

The White House is showcasing products from each state as part of its "Made in America" week.

The list includes some iconic U.S. brands — for example, Gibson Guitars from Tennessee and Steinway pianos from New York. Vermont Maple syrup and California wine are on the list. American flag manufacturers are highlighted from two states (Utah and Virginia).

Some of the choices are less obvious, like wheel barrows from Pennsylvania and door hinges from Missouri.

The State Department has issued new instructions about which citizens from the six Muslim-majority countries covered by the Trump administration's travel ban are eligible for visas.

The instructions issued to U.S. embassies and consulates widen the definition of a close familial relationship to include categories such as grandparents and cousins, in accordance with a federal court ruling last week, a State Department spokesman said in a statement to The Two-Way.

From one of the coldest places on Earth comes a heartwarming love story.

A pair of polar field guides got married over the weekend at a British research station, and the British Antarctic Survey says it's the first official wedding in Antarctic territory claimed by the U.K.

U.S. and Russian diplomats are planning to meet Monday to discuss two Russian diplomatic compounds that U.S. authorities seized in December because they were allegedly being used for intelligence activities.

The Obama administration shuttered the two Russian luxury estates — one in Long Island, N.Y. and the other in Centreville, Md. – in retaliation for the country's interference in the U.S. presidential elections. It also expelled 35 Russian officials.

As recently as 10 years ago, humans were thought to be the only species with the ability to plan.

Recent studies on great apes showed the ability is not uniquely human. Now, scientists in Sweden have come to the surprising conclusion that ravens can also deliberately prepare for future events.

"It is conservative to conclude that ravens perform similarly to great apes and young children," the researchers write. However, monkeys have failed similar experiments.

Amnesty International is accusing the U.S.-led coalition of potentially committing war crimes against civilians as it fought to wrest control of the Iraqi city of Mosul from Islamic State fighters. It says ISIS definitely committed war crimes there.

The forces aligned with Iraq's government allegedly used crude, imprecise weapons that caused an unnecessary level of civilian casualties, the U.K.-based rights group says.

Pope Francis has introduced a new pathway to Catholic sainthood, recognizing those who sacrifice their lives for others.

The new category, introduced in a official letter from the pope on Tuesday, is "one of the most significant changes in centuries to the Roman Catholic Church's saint-making procedures," Reuters reports.

Five years ago, the U.N. warned that Gaza is expected to be unlivable by 2020. A new report now says conditions are deteriorating there even faster than it forecast.

"What needed to happen has not happened, and the indicators are accelerating instead of slowing down," Robert Piper, the U.N. Coordinator for Humanitarian Aid and Development Activities in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, told NPR's Daniel Estrin.

Amnesty International says that Turkish authorities have detained its country director for Turkey, Idil Eser, amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent.

The U.K.-based rights group says Eser was taken into custody Wednesday morning with seven other human rights workers and two foreign trainers.

It happened as they took part in a "routine training event" in a hotel on an island near Istanbul, Amnesty adds.

The European Union and Japan have reached an agreement in principle for a new free trade deal, set to lower barriers to trade between two of the world's most important economic powers.

The Economic Partnership Agreement signed in Brussels on Thursday comes after 18 negotiating rounds over four years.

The U.K. government says it is waiving immigration rules for a 12-month period on foreign nationals directly impacted by last month's deadly tower fire in London.

A 19-year-old U.S. soldier has been killed in an attack in southern Afghanistan as he was taking part in counter-terror operations.

Pfc. Hansen B. Kirkpatrick of Wasilla, Alaska, had been stationed in Fort Bliss, Texas.

Two other service members were wounded in Monday's attack in Helmand province, according to a statement from the United States Armed Forces-Afghanistan.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott has scheduled the state's first execution in more than 18 months.

Executions have been on hold in Florida since the U.S. Supreme Court deemed parts of the state's sentencing procedure unconstitutional in January 2016.

That same month, Scott first signed a death warrant for Mark Asay, as member station WFSU reported. Now, "in a letter to the prison warden, Scott is setting Thursday, August 24 for Mark Asay's execution."

The asteroid that hit Earth 66 million years ago spelled disaster for the dinosaurs.

But scientists say they've found one silver lining to the mass extinction — turns out, it was really good for frogs.

The resilient animals date back some 200 million years. And in the aftermath of the extinction event, they survived and thrived, taking advantage of an ecological vacuum other animals left behind.

Tens of thousands of migrant workers have fled Thailand in the past week, fearing new labor regulations that the government announced last month.

"It's mainly workers from neighboring Myanmar and Cambodia," reporter Michael Sullivan tells our Newscast unit. "Millions are working in jobs such as construction and the seafood industry — many of them undocumented, and easy prey for unscrupulous employers."

The nerve agent sarin was used against Syrian civilians in April, according to a report from the international chemical weapons watchdog that confirms the suspicions of experts.

Simone Veil, a Holocaust survivor and women's rights advocate who was instrumental in legalizing abortion in France, has died at age 89.

Veil was among France's most popular politicians and was revered across the political spectrum. In 1979, she became the first directly elected president of the European Parliament.

U.S.-backed forces have surrounded the northern Syrian city of Raqqa, the Islamic State group's so-called capital, dealing a symbolic blow to the extremist group as it continues to lose territory.

However, human rights advocates are sounding the alarm about civilians still inside the besieged city, which ISIS seized in 2014.

U.N. human rights chief Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein said Wednesday that "up to 100,000 civilians are effectively trapped as the air and ground offensive intensifies."

Three civil society groups in France have filed a lawsuit against French banking giant BNP Paribas, accusing it of complicity in the 1994 Rwandan genocide that killed more than 800,000 people.

A federal appeals court paved the way on Wednesday for Ohio to resume executions by lifting a lower court's decision to halt the state's lethal injection process.

It was a contentious decision that split the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals judges in an 8-6 vote.

In the case brought by death row inmates, the judges focused on the effects of the sedative midazolam, one of the three lethal injection drugs used by Ohio.

A grand jury indicted three Chicago police officers on felony charges on Tuesday, accusing them of conspiring to cover up the facts of a fatal police shooting in October 2014 of a black teenager in order to shield their fellow officer.

Officer Jason Van Dyke, who is white, shot 17-year-old Laquan McDonald 16 times, according to prosecutors.

The U.S. State Department has issued highly public criticism of China in its latest annual report on the global state of human trafficking.

China is among the worst offenders of human trafficking, according to the Trafficking In Persons report. It's now lumped in with "Tier 3" offenders such as Syria, Iran, Russia and North Korea — the worst designation.

A new poll from the Pew Research Center has found that Donald Trump's presidency is strongly and negatively impacting how the rest of the world views the United States.

At the end of Barack Obama's term, 64 percent of global respondents said they were confident in the U.S. president, compared to 22 percent now. Seventy-four percent of those surveyed said they have no confidence in Trump.

Compared to the final years of Obama's presidency, Trump received higher ratings in just two of the 37 countries surveyed – Russia and Israel.

The Supreme Court has agreed to take up a case on whether the owner of a Colorado cake shop can refuse to provide service to same-sex couples due to his religious beliefs about marriage.

Jack Phillips, who along with his wife owns Masterpiece Cakeshop in suburban Denver, has argued that a state law compelling him to produce wedding cakes for gay couples, which runs counter to his religious beliefs, violates his right to free speech under the First Amendment.

A judge has declared a mistrial in the murder and manslaughter case against former University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing over his fatal shooting of black motorist Sam DuBose.

This is the second time the case has ended in a mistrial — the jury was deadlocked in the first trial, which ended last November.

Less than a week after a judge declared a mistrial in the sexual assault case against Bill Cosby, the comedian's representatives say he intends to host a series of town halls about sexual assault and the legal system.

Cosby spokesman Andrew Wyatt told the TV show Good Day Alabama that the town halls could start as soon as next month and noted that the issues were particularly important for young athletes.

A federal appeals court has upheld a lower court ruling that the confession of Brendan Dassey, whose case was part of the Netflix documentary series Making a Murderer, was involuntary. Dassey was found guilty of helping his uncle kill a young woman in 2005, and has been held in a Wisconsin prison.

A North Carolina man who fired an AR-15 rifle inside a pizza restaurant in Washington, D.C., last year as he was "investigating" a baseless conspiracy theory has been sentenced to four years in prison.

Edgar Maddison Welch pleaded guilty in March to federal charges of assault with a dangerous weapon and transporting a firearm over state lines. The case is seen as a clear example of the potential real-world consequences of fake news stories.

Updated at 5:54 p.m. ET

A jury has found a former Milwaukee police officer not guilty of first-degree reckless homicide in the shooting death of Sylville Smith, a 23-year-old black man, last August.

"Cries of outrage" erupted in the courtroom after the verdict was announced, member station WUWM reported.

The Department of Defense procured uniforms for the Afghan Army in a camouflage pattern that is both far more expensive than other options and likely inappropriate for the landscape there, a U.S. government watchdog says.

The pattern choice cost U.S. taxpayers as much as $28.2 million extra since 2008, according to a report out Wednesday, and if changed could save up to $72.21 million over the next 10 years.

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