Lance Orozco

News Director

Lance Orozco has been News Director of KCLU since 2001, developing the station's local news coverage as it transitioned to a news/talk format. He has provided award-winning local coverage of some of the biggest news events in the region, from brush fires and mudslides to Ronald Reagan's funeral. 

Lance has won more than 200 journalism awards for KCLU, including more than 90 Golden Mikes, 20-plus regional Edward R. Murrow awards, a national Edward R. Murrow Award (an honor which came to David Letterman’s attention on “The Late Show.”), and a national Society Of Professional Journalists Award  He has been AP's small market reporter of the year in the western U.S. nine times. 

Lance is a familiar face in the region, having worked nearly two decades as a television reporter and weathercaster in Santa Barbara and Los Angeles. His adventures included an unexpected guest appearance on "Late Night With David Letterman."

You can reach Lance here.

Fishermen

Picture this. You’re swimming in the ocean, and you look over, and see a giant, six foot long fish.

It could happen.

It’s one thing to give a ride to a friend, or to make a donation to help someone in need.

But, a Ventura County man literally gave one of his organs to save someone else’s life.

Lance Orozco has this incredible story of selflessness, and a budding new friendship.

Having a felony conviction for something like drug possession or shoplifting can be the difference between getting a job or not.

A state proposition intended to decrease jail overcrowding by releasing inmates for a half dozen non-violent offenses is also giving some people a chance to have their convictions reduced.

KCLU’s Lance Orozco talks with attorneys in the Ventura, and Santa Barbara County public defenders offices about the situation.

They are one of the most interesting units in the U.S. Navy. Naval Construction battalions, better known as “Seabees” are specially trained to build everything from airfields to housing around the world under combat conditions.

Their history was made famous by the classic World War II movie, “The Fighting Seabees.” What many people don’t know is that not only the Seabees history rooted in Ventura County, it’s home to the Seabees National Museum.

KCLU’s Lance Orozco reports that this weekend, the museum will host a free screening of “The Fighting Seabees.”  

It’s a measure commonly used to assess our health.

But, a new study co-authored by a UC Santa Barbara researcher suggests that this commonly used indicator may actually be labeling people who are healthy as obese.

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