Danielle Kurtzleben

Danielle Kurtzleben is a political reporter assigned to NPR's Washington Desk. She appears on NPR shows, writes for the web, and is a regular on the NPR Politics Podcast. Her reporting is wide-ranging, with particular focuses on gender politics, demographics, and economic policy.

Before joining NPR in 2015, Kurtzleben spent a year as a correspondent for Vox.com. As part of the site's original reporting team, she covered economics and business news.

Prior to Vox.com, Kurtzleben was with U.S. News & World Report for nearly four years, where she covered the economy, campaign finance and demographic issues. As associate editor, she launched Data Mine, a data visualization blog on usnews.com.

A native of Titonka, Iowa, Kurtzleben has a bachelor's degree in English from Carleton College. She also holds a master's degree in Global Communication from George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs.

Thirteen socialists walk into a West Virginia bar.

It's a Saturday evening in early July, and the North Central West Virginia chapter of the Democratic Socialists of America is getting together at a brewery outside of Rivesville.

Everyone here has their own stories for how they came to socialism. For chapter co-founder Kelley Rose, a 36-year-old who works for a nonprofit helping young adults stay in school and find jobs, religion played a big part.

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Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has electrified Democratic Party activists, not only by pulling off a major political upset in New York's 14th Congressional District primary this week but with her progressive politics, working-class roots, and background as a Latina.

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If you pay MoviePass 10 dollars a month, you can go to the movies every day. That's a dream for movie buffs, and it's attracted a lot of subscribers. But it also means the company is losing millions of dollars every month.

But this business model — lose lots of money up front and find a way to be profitable later — is becoming more common these days. But is it really sustainable? Today on the show, how MoviePass CEO Mitch Lowe is trying to come up with an answer.

The teen summer job is a vaunted tradition...one that is fading. Today's teenagers just aren't working at nearly the same rates as older generations did. Today we explore why, even with really low unemployment, the teen job market isn't picking up more. Some of it is because teens don't want to work, but some of it is also because employers don't want to employ them.

Music: "Black Surf Duel"

The nation just got an update on the gig economy — a major survey of independent, informal, and temporary work just got updated for the first time in almost 13 years. On today's Indicator, we look at how this kind of alternative work arrangement has changed the economy in the last decade or so... and how it hasn't.

The New York Stock Exchange got its start more than 200 years ago, with an agreement, signed by 24 men under a buttonwood tree on Wall Street.

Up to that point trading was a chaotic operation, conducted on street corners and in coffee houses, with basically no rules. So when America's young government declined to write its own regulations, a group of traders took it upon themselves to enter into a gentlemen's agreement that would lay the groundwork for the Wall Street we know today.

A few weeks ago, a tweet about retirement advice caused an uproar on Twitter. Here's what it said: "By 35, you should have twice your salary saved, according to retirement experts." People had feelings about this tweet. And with good reason; it quickly became clear that a lot of people feel like that kind of goal is impossible to achieve. So we wanted to know: how much do people at that age actually have saved? And how much should they save? We asked experts — including the inventor of the 401k himself — what they think.

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The Federal Election Commission has ruled that federal candidates can use campaign funds to pay for child care costs that result from time spent running for office.

On Thursday, the FEC ruled unanimously, 4-0, in favor of New York Democratic House candidate Liuba Grechen Shirley.

There's already a record number of women running for House seats and governorships in 2018 — and women Senate candidates are on track to break records as well.

On the first big night of the 2018 primaries this week, those women fared particularly well.

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A record number of women are running for Congress this year, and women candidates fared great in yesterday's primaries. NPR political reporter Daniel Kurtzleben has been tracking those results. She is here to put them in context. Hey, Danielle.

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