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Missile Launch 2/25
Staff Sgt. Jim Araos / U.S. Air Force

If you were out late last night, you might have gotten a glimpse of the latest missile launch from the Central Coast.

An unarmed Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile was successfully test launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base at 11:01 p.m.

The missile successfully flew 4200 miles to a test range in the Western Pacific, where an instrument package was deployed.

It’s the second Minuteman III launch from the base in less than a week, with one successfully tested last Saturday.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is scolding employees for what he calls "several recent instances" of people crossing out "black lives matter" on signature walls at the company's headquarters and writing "all lives matter" instead.

Ted Olson is one of the most prominent lawyers working in America today. He argued on behalf of George W. Bush in Bush v. Gore and was the solicitor general for most of Bush's first term. A star conservative lawyer, he surprised many when he joined the fight to legalize same-sex marriage, taking up the battle against California's Proposition 8 (and allying with David Boies, who argued for Gore in Bush v. Gore).

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Apple CEO Tim Cook put himself and his company front and center in a national debate on digital privacy, when he decided Apple would not comply with a federal court order to help unlock an iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino terrorists.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Days of news about an Apple iPhone have left us with this consistent feeling. It's that we've all been having highly sophisticated arguments about the Internet and encryption without entirely grasping what we're saying.

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Apple and the FBI are facing off in court over an encrypted iPhone 5C that was used by San Bernardino shooter Syed Rizwan Farook. The phone stopped backing up to the cloud, which the investigators have already searched, several weeks before the Dec. 2 attack.

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Now let's consider the man who's front and center in this national debate, Apple's CEO. NPR's Laura Sydell looks at the company under Tim Cook.

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Meet a man on a mission, a mission to stop telemarketers. It all started with a passion for phones.

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One of the best ways to understand Zika virus might be to deliberately inject it into volunteers.

That idea may sound a little crazy, but it's not unprecedented. And some researchers are hoping the approach could help speed up the search for an effective Zika vaccine.

Right now, a bunch of labs are pursuing different ways of making a vaccine against Zika, mostly because of the concern that the virus might be linked to the birth defect called microcephaly.

After a court ordered Apple to help federal investigators get into an encrypted iPhone, the company responded with a court filing Thursday that describes the FBI-requested order as illegal, unconstitutional and dangerous.

"No court has ever authorized what the government now seeks, no law supports such unlimited and sweeping use of the judicial process, and the Constitution forbids it," Apple's lawyers wrote in the company's motion to vacate the order.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It seems the quality of the cars we drive is on the decline, so says a report from J.D. Power and Associates. The thing bothering consumers, not the engine or safety, it's the entertainment. Here's NPR's Sonari Glinton.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The software equivalent of cancer - that is how Apple CEO Tim Cook is describing code the government wants Apple to write so the FBI can unlock the iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino terrorists.

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