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After an onslaught of criticism over the past week, actress Scarlett Johansson announced on Friday she will be pulling out of the starring role in Rub & Tug, a film based on the true story of a transgender man who ran a ring of prostitution fronts.

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In the U.S., children under the age of 18 are legally barred from purchasing cigarettes or other tobacco products. But they are allowed to harvest tobacco on farms.

Despite a worldwide decline in production, tobacco remains North Carolina's most valuable crop. In 2017, the total value of tobacco produced in the state was just under $725 million, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross says he will sell all of the remaining stock he holds. He announced the move in a statement Thursday night after receiving a letter from the government's top ethics watchdog warning of the "potential for a serious criminal violation."

The letter was sent by David J. Apol, the Acting Director and General Counsel for the Office of Government Ethics. Apol faulted Ross for what he said were various omissions and inaccurate statements submitted to the OGE over the past year.

Afro-Brazilian culture is so central to Brazil's port city of Salvador that the city has earned the nickname Roma Negra, or "Black Rome." The nickname resonates with Brazilians who recognize Salvador as a black cultural and intellectual capital — a place where city and culture are as deeply intertwined as Christianity is with Rome.

Afro-Brazilian drummers, snack vendors and visual artists hum through Salvador's streets and plazas. These cultural fixtures are also small businesses — and their challenges are emblematic of those shared nationwide by black Brazilians in business.

Congressional Republicans are growing increasingly worried that President Trump is on the verge of a trade war with China. But they're also realizing there is almost nothing they can do to stop him.

House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., put it bluntly during an event at The Economic Club of Washington on Thursday.

"You would have to pass a law to say don't raise those tariffs and the president would have to sign that law," Ryan said. "That's not going to happen."

Johnson & Johnson has been ordered to pay nearly $4.7 billion in damages to 22 women and their families who say asbestos found in the company's talcum powder contributed to their ovarian cancer.

The St. Louis Circuit Court jury awarded $4.14 billion in punitive damages and $550 million in compensatory damages to the plaintiffs, who said the company failed to warn about the cancer risks.

The Republic of Ireland took a crucial step Thursday toward becoming the first country in the world to divest from fossil fuels. Lawmakers in the Dail, the lower house of parliament, advanced a bill requiring the Irish government's more than $10 billion national investment fund to sell off stakes in coal, oil, gas and peat — and to do so "as soon as practicable."

Lindsay met a man named Howard on a dating site, fell in love, got married and added Durdle to her name.

Howard said they lived happily for a decade until she got sick — breast cancer — twice. She struggled. It spread. And she died on May 31.

On Tuesday of this week, Lindsay received a letter at what had been her home in Bucklebury, England.

"Important - You should read this notice carefully," the correspondence from PayPal began.

Updated at 5:39 p.m. ET

The U.S. Justice Department filed notice Thursday that it would seek to overturn a judge's earlier ruling that enabled telecom giant AT&T to take over the media conglomerate Time Warner, which owned HBO, CNN and Warner Bros. studios, among other properties.

Seven national fast-food chains have agreed, under pressure, to eliminate a practice that limits their workers' ability to take jobs at other restaurants in the same chain, the Washington state attorney general announced Thursday.

When director Iram Haq was a teenager in Norway, she was, in her own words, kidnapped by her parents and forced to spend more than a year of her life with relatives in Pakistan. That harrowing experience is now the foundation for Haq's second feature film What Will People Say, a blistering drama about the kind of culture clash that can traumatize a young woman for life.

Which is worse, corruption you can see or corruption you can't? In Dark Money, a documentary about invisible corporate shenanigans in her home state of Montana, director Kimberly Reed makes the incisive case that the latter threatens to sink our democracy outright.

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