Economy

Financial and business news

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A handful of companies — think Tyson and Perdue — all but control poultry production in the U.S. They'll soon be joined by a retailer known more for chicken sales than chicken production: Costco. The warehouse retailer is now building a farm-to-table production system to ensure a steady supply of rotisserie chickens.

Short Shrift For Short Sellers

18 minutes ago

Unlike most investors, short sellers make money when the value of a company falls. And they don't have a great reputation. They're often regarded as the vultures or hyenas of the financial world, preying on weak companies, and sometimes spreading negative rumors to bring a company down.

But quite often, short sellers perform a necessary task. They have a financial incentive to expose weakness and uncover the truth about a company's status. And when they do so, honestly and transparently, the market benefits.

With midterm elections just two weeks away, Facebook says it's ramping up its operations to fight disinformation.

The social media behemoth has established a "war room" at its headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif., where specialists try to detect and disrupt bad actors trying to delegitimize elections, spread fake information, and suppress the vote.

The State We're In: Collective Bargaining

3 hours ago

After the Supreme Court dealt a blow to unions in the Janus vs. AFSCME case this June, teacher’s unions are reeling.

From NPR

In Janus v. AFSCME, a 5-4 court majority overturned precedent, saying that public sector unions, like those that represent law enforcement, state employees, and, of course, teachers, can no longer collect what are known as agency fees from nonmembers.

Melissa McCarthy is not interested in playing pleasant characters — flawless women with perfect clothes and relationships. "Who wants to watch that?" she asks. "There's nothing to sink your teeth into. ... The people I love and like are filled with quirks and eccentricities. ... We're a bundle of all these different weirdnesses."

Instead, McCarthy became known for her comic roles in movies like Bridesmaids and The Heat — and for her impersonation of President Trump's first press secretary, Sean Spicer, on SNL.

Technology continues to get closer and closer to our bodies, from the phones in our pockets to the smartwatches on our wrists. Now, for some people, it's getting under their skin.

In Sweden, a country rich with technological advancement, thousands have had microchips inserted into their hands.

The chips are designed to speed up users' daily routines and make their lives more convenient — accessing their homes, offices and gyms is as easy as swiping their hands against digital readers.

This isn't exactly the golden age of airline travel, but it's a pretty good time to fly by a lot of measures. Flying has never been safer. Airfares are historically low when adjusted for inflation. Technology makes it easier to search for fares and book flights while also helping airlines lose fewer bags and improve their on-time performance.

But if there's one thing air travelers still love to complain about, it's the size of economy class seats.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The vice president came to the Kennedy Center last night. That would be HBO's Veep: Julia Louis-Dreyfus.

The 11-time Emmy Award-winner was in Washington, D.C. to accept the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor. Plenty of big names in comedy were there to present it to her.

Julia Louis-Dreyfus grew up in Washington, D.C. She went to Holton-Arms School in Bethesda, Maryland, the same private high school as Christine Blasey Ford — the woman who accused Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her 36 years ago.

It was Tina Fey who first made the connection.

The cost of housing is out of reach for many residents in cities such as Los Angeles and Seattle. One solution is called co-living, and it looks a lot like dorm life. Co-living projects are trying to fill a vacuum between low-income and luxury housing in expensive housing markets where people in the middle are left with few choices.

As Amandla Stenberg prepared for her lead role in the film adaptation of The Hate U Give, she devoured Angie Thomas' 2017 young adult novel. "Reading the book became this strange, spiritual thing because it started to feel like I was reading my own diary," she says.

Thanks to the Internet, you can buy just about anything online and have it shipped to you in a few days or less.

The process is reminiscent of the early 1900s, when people turned to mail-order catalogs to find things to buy. And — amazingly, for the time — they could even order homes via catalog.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Forty years ago, horror fans were introduced to the masked killer Michael Myers, stalker of babysitters in a small Illinois town. The film was, of course, Halloween. And it was the debut of Jamie Lee Curtis, who played the bookish babysitter, Laurie Strode — the original "final girl" character who narrowly escapes the slaughter. Curtis appeared in three more sequels and even died in one. She thought she'd left that character behind.

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