Arts & Culture

Arts & culture

This summer, All Things Considered is on the hunt for great reading recommendations. In our second installment — you can find the first here — Janet Webster Jones, owner of Source Booksellers in Detroit, shares her selections with NPR's Audie Cornish. Click the audio link above to hear Jones describe these great summer reads:

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(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "GOOD MORNING, VIETNAM")

Ah, summer. What a wonderful time to head to the backyard or up to the rooftop deck and grill up a few burgers for you and your pals.

Growing up, every time my dad made his famous ribs — well, famous in our house — I'd always rush to the dinner table, fashion a bib out of paper towels, and dig in.

But I can't yet say I have mastered my grilling technique as an adult. My main problem is, I have no idea how to grill. So once I figure that out I'll be fine, right?

Reclaim Your Data

Jul 23, 2018

Former Department of Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff says the most dangerous threat we — individually and as a society and country — face today is no longer military, but rather the increasingly pervasive exposure of our personal data.

He thinks nothing undermines our freedom more than losing control of private information about ourselves. And yet, we are ever more vulnerable to cyber-attacks.

Looking back on the past year of some incredible sessions this week, World Cafe is digging into the archives for some of its best performances and interviews since last July. You'll hear sessions with artists including singer-songwriter Natalie Prass, "the Croz" himself, David Crosby, Australian rocker Courtney Barnett and more.

The ideal Italian pizza, be it Neapolitan or Roman, has a crisp crust flecked with dark spots — marks left by a blazing hot oven. The dough is fluffy, moist and stretchy, and the toppings are piping hot. A pizzeria's brick oven pops these out to perfection, but intrepid home cooks attempting to re-create Italian-style pizzas have more than likely discovered facsimiles are nigh impossible to produce.

Clyde Ellison grew up in a part of Brooklyn called Red Hook, and even though it was a rough, economically disadvantaged neighborhood, he says the people he knew there had a wealth of talent and ingenuity. Ellison himself is proof of that. He's in his early 30s now and lives in Los Angeles as a rapper, performing under the stage name Clyde Guevara. And although he's moved across the country, his lyrics often grapple with the issues in his home community "like being a gangster," he says. "Being tough. It's really like the wilderness."

This post discusses the events of Sunday night's POSE season finale.

It wasn't layered. It wasn't nuanced. It was didactic in some places, and mawkish in others, often reaching for sentiment only to achieve sentimentality instead. Characters didn't so much converse as stand and deliver long declamatory paragraphs at each other, in precisely the way real people don't — you could hear the writing, always. The cast approached the material with great fervor, if not, in all cases, great finesse.

San Diego Comic-Con wrapped up on Sunday. NPR comic buffs Mallory Yu and Petra Mayer discuss highlights of the convention's last day, in which women, writers of color — and monsters — took front and center.

Petra: Mallory, oh, my God, we made it. We made it. We almost got sidetracked just trying to find a place to sit down and eat some crummy convention concession pizza (although by Grabthar's hammer, crummy convention concession pizza was what my soul desired) but we made it through the week.

Oakland, Calif., means different things to different people.

For many, it's the birthplace of groundbreaking art and politics. But Oakland, like many major cities across the country, is changing.

That's the tension at the heart of a new film called Blindspotting. It tells the story of two lifelong friends and Oakland natives, one white and one black, as they grapple with fitting into this new world.

Remembering L.A. Food Critic Jonathan Gold

Jul 22, 2018

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There's a vitally important word in the epic tale of Beowulf and, according to Maria Dahvana Headley, it's been translated incorrectly for a very long time. The word is aglæca/æglæca — no one's entirely sure how to pronounce it – and, as Headley explains, that same word is used to describe Beowulf and his three antagonists: Grendel, Grendel's mother, and the dragon.

Remembering Food Critic Jonathan Gold

Jul 22, 2018

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