Arts & Culture

Arts & culture

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Here is a challenge for you. Name one great painting that makes you laugh. If none comes to mind now or ever, that's probably because...

JUDITH BRODIE: There's a high seriousness, I would say, to paintings...

In her first novel, Swallowing Geography, the English novelist and playwright Deborah Levy described a character becoming "many selves in order to survive. Through observation, study, and meditation she taught herself to change from one self to another, from one state to another." It's an early, tossed-off line, but it predicts Levy's whole body of work. Over and over, this is the story she tells: First a woman learns to change selves, and then she chooses, defiantly, to be the one self she likes best.

Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

Are you up for having a good time today? Trick question — it's impossible not to have a good time with The Suffers, as Kam Franklin explains in the opening lines of "Do Whatever": "Full on disclosure, I'm not here for exposure / I came to have a good time, so let me shine."

Darlene Love: From Background to Limelight

Jul 13, 2018

When the creators of the 2013 documentary 20 Feet From Stardom began envisioning a film focused on backup singers, one name kept coming up: Darlene Love. Among fans and musicians alike, Love had a sterling reputation as one of music's legendary, if still somewhat under-celebrated voices performing behind the biggest acts. So after speaking to Love, director Morgan Neville said he was finally convinced that he could make an entire movie on the topic, one that heavily showcased Love's long-winding career and countless behind-the-scenes stories.

Sally Kohn: What Is The Opposite Of Hate?

Jul 13, 2018

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Why We Hate.

About Sally Kohn's TED Talk

Political commentator Sally Kohn wanted to understand why people hate. She traveled the world tracking down stories of hatred - but along the way, discovered an uncomfortable truth about her own past.

About Sally Kohn

Christian Picciolini: How Do You Unlearn Hatred?

Jul 13, 2018

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Why We Hate.

About Christian Picciolini's TED Talk

As a teenager, Christian Picciolini joined a violent neo-Nazi group. But he began to question his hateful beliefs when strangers offered him something unexpected: compassion.

About Christian Picciolini

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Why We Hate.

About Anand Giridharadas' TED Talk

Anand Giridharadas spent two years researching a man who committed a string of hate crimes after 9/11. Along the way, he uncovered a striking story of mercy from an unlikely source: the man's victim.

About Anand Giridharadas

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Why We Hate.

About Dylan Marron's TED Talk

Before starting his podcast, Dylan Marron thought the only way to fight hate was to shut down opposing viewpoints. But after calling several of his trolls, he realized conversation was much more effective.

About Dylan Marron

Muppets Head To London

Jul 13, 2018

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene with a guest.

MATT VOGEL: (As Kermit) Hey-ho. Kermit the Frog here.

GREENE: Hey, Kermit. OK, so the Muppets' first full-length European show this weekend in London. Are you excited? Wait. Where are you going?

Ask Rodney Crowell to point out musical mementos in his home 40 minutes south of Nashville, and he'll hurry you past the plaques commemorating his professional success. "I didn't put these up," he calls over his shoulder, striding down the hallway. "My wife did."

Seven national fast-food chains have agreed, under pressure, to eliminate a practice that limits their workers' ability to take jobs at other restaurants in the same chain, the Washington state attorney general announced Thursday.

When director Iram Haq was a teenager in Norway, she was, in her own words, kidnapped by her parents and forced to spend more than a year of her life with relatives in Pakistan. That harrowing experience is now the foundation for Haq's second feature film What Will People Say, a blistering drama about the kind of culture clash that can traumatize a young woman for life.

Which is worse, corruption you can see or corruption you can't? In Dark Money, a documentary about invisible corporate shenanigans in her home state of Montana, director Kimberly Reed makes the incisive case that the latter threatens to sink our democracy outright.

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