Work Underway To Return Half Century Old Golf Course On South Coast To Native Wetlands

You hear a mix of nature, and man in some wetlands near UC Santa Barbara. There’s the chirping of birds, the wind blowing through brush, and the sound of earth movers off in the dance. Usually, the sound of earthmovers around wetlands is a bad thing for the environment, because it means development is taking away a slice of nature. But, bulldozers are going to be moving here on UCSB’s North Campus to help nature, by returning a half century old golf course to wetlands.

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California Coast News

A coalition of environmental groups on the Central and South Coasts have filed a lawsuit against a water district, saying a dam it operates isn’t releasing enough water to help endangered steelhead.

The lawsuit was filed by San Luis Obispo Coastkeeper and Los Padres ForestWatch against the Santa Maria Water Conservation District. The suit seeks an increase in water releases from Twitchell Dam, which is on the Cuyama River, which feeds into the Santa Maria River.

New information on a South Coast sewage spill this week shows it was much larger than first thought, but that the flow was stopped before it could reach a popular beach.

The spill occurred Tuesday morning in the Goleta area, and was initially estimated at about a thousand gallons. Goleta Sanitary District officials say a partially plugged sewer line sent raw sewage through a manhole near a bike path at Nogal and Nueces Drives, and into a creek bed.

You hear a mix of nature, and man in some wetlands near UC Santa Barbara.

There’s the chirping of birds, the wind blowing through brush, and the sound of earth movers off in the dance.

Usually, the sound of earthmovers around wetlands is a bad thing for the environment, because it means development is taking away a slice of nature. But, bulldozers are going to be moving here on UCSB’s North Campus to help nature, by returning a half century old golf course to wetlands.

(VCSO Photo)

A traffic stop on the South Coast has led to a massive drug bust, with more than a hundred thousand doses of methamphetamine seized.

A Ventura County Sheriff’s deputy stopped a car Saturday night near Rose Avenue and Ives Avenue in Oxnard for a possible traffic violation. The deputy says they discovered Daniel Sanchez of Poway was driving with an expired license.

The officer aided by Oxnard Police then searched the car.

Santa Barbara County firefighters were busy with a rash of brush fires on the Central Coast, but knocked them down before they could cause damage.

Mike Eliason, with the County Fire Department, says five small blazes occurred off of the northbound 101 between Los Alamos and Orcutt just after 4 p.m. Wednesday. They were quickly put out.

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Tech Incubator On South Coast Helps Ideas Like Program To Help Those With Autism Become Reality

One in 68 children in America are on the autism spectrum. Many of these kids will grow up and have a hard time finding a job, not because of a lack of capability, but because they don’t have the social skills to find the positions. A Ventura County college student decided to try to help with that problem with a new project: “Coding Autism.”

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Two years ago, when Amanda Gomez could not get financial aid for community college, she decided to enroll part time at El Paso Community College in Texas. This gave her time to work to pay for her courses.

Being a part-time student has its pros — mainly a lighter course load. But Gomez feels like she misses out on some important experiences, like being able to stay back after class to talk to her instructors, or study in libraries on campus.

She says the difference was notable when she took a semester as a full-time student.

President Trump has said over and over that creating jobs is at the top of his agenda. It may seem unfair to judge his progress on this goal in his first 100 days, but Trump has opened the door to scrutiny by making his own assertions on job creation.

Even though President Trump calls the 100-days measure "ridiculous," the White House is still touting what one press release called the president's "historic accomplishments" — including 28 laws he has signed since taking office.

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And let's follow up on a warning about U.S. security. Former CIA Director Jim Woolsey laid it out yesterday on this program talking of one way that North Korea could use a nuclear device.

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We've been getting the perspective on North Korea from Washington, D.C., and from Seoul. Today, we're going to get the view from China, specifically from the town of Dandong on the border with North Korea.

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Nearly 100 days into his administration, President Trump has drastically reduced the flow of immigration, both legal and illegal, to the U.S. He's been able to accomplish that without any new legislation — and without many of his signature ideas solidly in place, including executive orders that have been put on hold by the courts and a proposed wall on the Mexican border.

Arkansas, which has been in a race to execute death-row inmates before a key lethal drug expires, plans to hold its final execution in the series Thursday night.

Attorneys for the condemned men have put forth arguments about their innocence, intellectual abilities, mental states and about the execution procedure.

But what happens to those debates after an execution?

Ledell Lee was the first inmate executed this month in Arkansas. There was scant physical evidence tying him to the murder he was convicted of, and he was never given a DNA test before his execution.

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