New Exhibition Opening At South Coast Museum Stars Some Of The World's Rarest Autos

It’s lunchtime, and a couple of workers are sitting at some outside benches enjoying their meals in an Oxnard industrial park. The complex near Rose Avenue and Channel Islands Boulevard is filled with giant gray warehouse style buildings which mostly look alike. But, one of these buildings shocks everyone who steps through its doors. It’s Disneyland for hard core auto lovers, and home to some of the most prized vehicles in the world.

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California Coast News

Photo by David Grannis

A documentary on California’s historic drought produced by a South Coast college professor and his students will be screened this week.

The film “Turf Wars: SoCal Water Conservation” takes a deep look into the state’s severe drought and its impacts.  It was created by a film professor and his two students at California Lutheran University in Thousand Oaks. 

Karie Portillo Guerra, who was a student when she helped create the film, says it was eye-opening to see the devastation in Central Valley towns that had pumped their groundwater dry.

Santa Barbara County is holding budget workshops this week to start what could be a very difficult process, with the county having to cope with financial impacts of the Thomas Fire, and flood.

County officials say aside from the immediate financial impacts of dealing with the twin disasters, the damage will affect the revenue base for several years.

A South Coast community that has long been waiting for open space finally has a park of their own. 

Kellogg Park located at Kellogg Street and Ventura Avenue on the Westside of Ventura is now open to the public. 

Photo by Community Environmental Council

Some nonprofits across the South and Central Coasts will be able to go solar at no cost.

The Community Environmental Council is launching a new pilot program called Solarize Nonprofit.

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Struggles Continue For Those Who Had Homes Destroyed, Damaged By Thomas Fire and Flood

It’s a warm, sunny morning, and a stream of water less than a yard wide trickles down Montecito Creek, just off of East Valley Road in Montecito. It is deceivingly peaceful, almost serene here. Less than a hundred feet away, Mary Beth Myers walks under a cluster of sycamore and oak trees. This is where her cottage once stood, an area called Old Spanish Town, where a cluster of small homes were washed away by the January 9th storm.

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Live Feed: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg Testifies Before Congress

Zuckerberg is set to answer questions about protecting user data after news that a data-mining and political consulting firm used that data to try and target Facebook users during the 2016 election.

Death Valley, Calif., one of the hottest places in the world, is in bloom with more than 20 species of colorful desert wildflowers.

The New York State Supreme Court has ruled that chain restaurants in New York City can be fined after Mar. 1 for failing to post sodium warnings on certain items on their menus.

The ruling is a win for the city's Board of Health, which unanimously passed a rule last September that requires chains with 15 or more locations nationwide to print a salt-shaker warning icon next to menu items containing 2,300 or more milligrams of sodium.

Keila Atuesta Jaimes, a petite 25-year-old, is lying on an exam table next to an ultrasound machine. The doctor moves the wand across her belly. It's pretty flat. She's only about three months pregnant. Then suddenly, there's the heartbeat!

Atuesta smiles. Nervously. About three weeks ago she came down with the kind of rash and fever she figured could mean only one thing: Zika.

Across the U.S., more than 20 million people abuse drugs or alcohol or both. Only about 1 in 10 is getting treatment.

People seeking treatment often have to wait weeks or months for help. The delays can jeopardize the chances they'll be able to recover from their addiction.

When you edit a blog called "Goats and Soda," and you read a story about a goat locked in a car in the parking lot of a Home Depot in Oxford, Mass., and you learn that the goat turned on the hazard lights and wipers, pooped on the driver's seat and ... drank an old cup of soda, you have no choice.

You have to cover the story.

One of the most puzzling astronomical discoveries of the past decade has just gotten a little bit clearer. Astronomers still don't know what's producing the brief, powerful bursts of radio waves they've been detecting, but for the first time, they've been able to see where one of them is coming from.

Astronomers first detected these so-called fast radio bursts in 2007. Until now, all 16 FRBs that have been reported have been found by combing through archival data.

On the eve of South Korean President Park Geun-hye's third anniversary in office, protesters gathered in Seoul on Wednesday to condemn the administration's increasing crackdown on free speech. These protesters were unlike any others Seoul has seen. They were holograms.

The life-size hologram "ghosts" marched across a transparent screen facing an old palace gate at Gwanghwamun Square, a historic center in Seoul.

Social networks have changed the world, but they make things very complicated for the CIA.

Facebook, Twitter and other services give the spy agency enormous amounts of new information about people of interest around the world, but they also open up huge new vulnerabilities.

For example, how should the CIA conceal details about a spy who has been sharing information about herself online before joining the agency — perhaps since she was in middle school? And can it create a convincing enough story about people who have to lie about who they really are?

The mayor of Ithaca, N.Y., wants to create a place where people can use heroin or other drugs injected drugs under supervision, in an effort to combat soaring deaths from overdoses. But that's a lot easier said than done.

Mohammed Sayed is not one of those people who particularly relish the prospect of hitting young men on the butt with a big stick.

But he is certainly prepared to do so to defend the girls and women who frequent the neatly groomed, palm-dotted municipal park in the Pakistani city of Gujranwala where he works as a guard.

The park was designed as a place for relaxation and family recreation (it even includes some ramshackle carnival rides). But it had turned into a prowling ground for young men.

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